Lent II – Matt 17:1-4

1 And after six days Jesus taketh unto him Peter and James, and John his brother, and bringeth them up into a high mountain apart:

Origen: In six days this whole visible world was made; so he who is above all the things of this world, may ascend into the high mountain, and there see the glory of the Word of God.

2 And he was transfigured before them. And his face did shine as the sun: and his garments became white as snow.

Gloss: Christ shadows out the saints, of whom Esaias says, “With all these shalt thou clothe thee as with a garment;” [Isa 49:18] and they are likened to snow because they shall be white with virtues, and all the heat of vices shall be put far away from them.

3 And behold there appeared to them Moses and Elias talking with him.

Chrysostom: Because the multitudes said He was Elias, or Jeremias, or one of the Prophets, He here brings with Him the chief of the Prophets, that hence at least may be seen the difference between the servants and their Lord.

Origen: If any man discerns a spiritual sense in the Law agreeing with the teaching of Jesus, and in the Prophets finds “the hidden wisdom of Christ,” [1 Cor 2:7] he beholds Moses and Elias in the same glory with Jesus.

4 And Peter answering, said to Jesus: Lord, it is good for us to be here: if thou wilt, let us make here three tabernacles, one for thee, and one for Moses, and one for Elias.

Jerome: If thou wilt have three tabernacles, set not the servants equal with their Lord, but make three tabernacles, yea make one for the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, that They whose divinity is one, may have but one tabernacle, in thy bosom.

Remigius: He was wrong moreover, in desiring that the kingdom of the elect should be set up on earth, when the Lord had promised to give it in heaven. He was wrong also in forgetting that himself and his fellows were mortal, and in desiring to come to eternal felicity without taste of death.

Scripture from the Douay-Rheims Bible. Commentary from St. Thomas Aquinas, Catena Aurea, Vol. I (London: Rivington, 1842).

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