Lent V – John 11:38-40

38 Jesus therefore again groaning in himself, cometh to the sepulchre. Now it was a cave; and a stone was laid over it.

Augustine: And do you too groan in yourself, if you would rise to new life. To every man is this said, who is weighed down by any vicious habit. It was a cave, and a stone lay upon it. The dead under the stone is the guilty under the Law.

Christ troubleth Himself, to signify to thee that thou shouldest be troubled, when thou art pressed and weighed down with such a mass of sin. Faith groans, he that is displeased with himself groaneth, and accuseth his own evil deeds; that so the habit of sin may yield to the violence of repentance.

39 Jesus saith: Take away the stone. . . .

Augustine: Mystically, take away the burden of the law, proclaim grace.

39 . . . Martha, the sister of him that was dead, saith to him: Lord, by this time he stinketh, for he is now of four days.

Augustine: Mary and Martha, the sisters of Lazarus, though they had often seen Christ raise the dead, did not fully believe that He could raise their brother.

Theophylact: Martha said this from weakness of faith, thinking it impossible that Christ could raise her brother, so long after death.

Bede: Or, these are not words of despair, but of wonder.

40 Jesus saith to her: Did not I say to thee, that if thou believe, thou shalt see the glory of God?

Chrysostom: She did not remember what He said above, . . . To the disciples He had said That the Son of God might be glorified thereby; here it is the glory of the Father He speaks of.

Scripture from the Douay-Rheims Bible. Commentary from St. Thomas Aquinas, Catena Aurea, Vol. IV (London: Rivington, 1845).

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